Announcing PrntrBoard V2

Reflecting on the PrntrBoard V1, there are many good things that I managed to accomplish:

    • all 3 versions of the board (2130, 2660 and 2209) were functional
    • the board features were good
    • driver cooling was excellent

When I started 2 years ago, there were very few 32-bit boards with comparable features. Now there is quite a bit of them. I was trying to find what makes one design more popular than the other and in addition to the board features it comes down to flexibility.

In PrntrBoard V1 I was trying to provide superior cooling solution compared to the tiny replaceable driver board used everywhere. However that choice came at the expense of a monolithic design, which was expensive to make and costly to evolve. Every time I wanted to use a different driver chip I had to re-design the whole board from scratch. It was not going to be sustainable in the long run.

Announcing the PrntrBoardV2: combining all lessons learned and expanding the versatility of the design.

First major change is that the motor drivers are no longer part of the board. Because I still find the original Pololu driver form factor very limiting, I designed the motor driver carried boards to use PCIe slots instead of pin headers.

Here is what the carrier board looks like

The board has 32-bit Arm micro controller – my favorite STM32F407. There are 6 stepper motor slots, with support for 6 thermistors or 6 thermocouples (vie external boards).

There are 4 power MOSFET outputs (1 bed and 3 heaters) and 5 low power MOSFET outputs for fans or LEDs.

Connectivity is via traditional USB, micro-sd card. There are 2 more serial ports for a smart LCD controller and WiFi extension.

I have the traditional RAMPS LCD expansion headers, which should support a variety of LCD screen designs.

Last but not least there are 8 end stops and the ability to route the stall detection signal from the steppers to individual end stops or a global “Alarm” signal.

Drivers are on separate boards with PCIe card edge connectors. This is what the TMC2660 version looks like

And this is what the TMC2209 version looks like

I added some mounting holes next to the PCIe slots so the drivers would not wiggle out of the slot with extensive vibrations.

These driver boards are much larger than the Pololu drivers, which would allow for superior cooling and the ability to have more board real estate for complex designs and or big driver ICs.

In addition the driver boards are mounted vertically on the carrier board, which saves space on the carrier board and allow for excellent air flow trough the drivers with a pair of 40mm fans.

Last but not least because of the reduced requirements on the carrier board, I can use 2 layer instead of 4 layer board, which makes the cost even lower.

I can’t wait to make a few of these and run them trough some tests.

Tested LCD interface

I had one RAMPS discount full graphics controller laying around from my RigidBot. I did use it with the original controller and decided to test it with the PrntrBoard.

In Rev1 and Rev2 of the board I did not have enough pins on the LCD connector to be able to use all buttons on the panel. In the Rev3 I used every last pin of the tiny 64-pin package and I just got enough (or so I thought).

I learned the SPI used by the LCD panel is not very standard and had to fight with Marlin to make the TMC drivers and the LCD co-exist on the same SPI bus.

Finally I was able to use the panel:

One of the pins I used for the button input did not quite cooperate, so I have only one button + the rotary controller for the UI. Lucky for me both Marlin and Smoothieware were functioning with that configuration.

I had to disable the TMC diver monitoring, because the LCD controller was getting confused by the SPI communication with the TMC drivers. I think I can create a small breakout board with a few AND gates to alleviate this interference.

Here is a video of the panel working in Smoothieware:

 

More progress on the Smoothieware for STM32

After a few unsuccessful attempts, I got Smoothie to move my stepper motors on the PrntrBoard controller.

At first the smoothie had a bug in the SPI dirver and was unable to talk to the TMC2130 chips. Fixed that, then the steppers still would not move.

I can see the drivers were sending current, because my power supply would start the fans up, but zero steps. I spend the day trying to diff the configuration between Marlin and Smoothie, but nothing was wrong. Finally caught a bug in the Stepper timers and lo and behold movement.

I’ll make a video of my Rigidbot running Smoothie on STM32 next week.

Smoothieware on the PRNTRboard

Thanks to the huge work by Matt Baker, I now have Smoothieware V1 booting on the Prntrboard. Matt did an excellent job with the initial port of Smoothie to the STM32 series of CPUs. I did some tweaks and added a target for the NUCLEO-64 board I’m using. After a few weeks of work it does boot and I can verify the temperature controller works.

It does not have all features of the original Smoothie board (no SD-card and no Network) but I do have better drivers – TMC2130.

Here is a picture of me testing the hot end heater control:

The heater was set to a “safe” 55 degree Celsius. I would say the PWM control for the heater is much “smoother” on the Smoothieware.

My port of Smoothieware V1 is on github. My working branch is stm32f4. I also have stm32f4-tmc2130 with the TMC patches.

https://github.com/ghent360/Smoothieware-STM32F4

Here is a picture of the heater setup: