TMC2660 success at last

I was very frustrated with my failure to get the TMC2660 board variation running. I checked and double checked the connections, alas the steppers would not move at all.

I purchased one TMC2660-BOB kit from digikey and started experimenting with it, instead of my board. At first, I had the same failure – the stepper would not move at all. The software was a very simple Arduino sketch – what would be that wrong. Since the kit was designed by Trinamic, the hardware should be proper. Alas, no luck. I declared the TMC2660 chip cursed and moved to my soldering machine project.

Yesterday I decided to give the test jig one more try. After a few failed attempts. I spotted an error in the Arduino code – I was passing the incorrect CS pin in the driver setup. DUH!!! After a quick fix it was working.

Then I moved back to my original goal to test the thermal dissipation ability of my TMC2660 PrntrBoard design. I connected my board and started to torture test the motor driver. Unfortunately I was not able to run the driver past 1.5A RMS, which is a shame. I’ll try using a different motor with higher coli resistance. Anyhow here is an image from my thermal camera of the top of the ship:

The chip has no heat-sink and runs at 54C. This is not bad at all. much cooler than the TMC2130 version. The board seems to be dissipating quite a bit of the energy.

Here is a picture of the bottom of the board:

The bottom is at 45C in the center, which I think is quite good thermal conductivity of the board layers.

I feel good about the board thermal capabilities. If I add heat-sinks on the top and the bottom it should be able to run at 2A RMS and above with active cooling.

Soldering machine improvements

I was very confident in my soldering machine from the tests I conducted the previous week. I decided to program a whole board and try it out.

Alas the confidence was premature and multiple failures ensued. Here is an example

I tried many things, but the soldering wire was hitting the pin and was not melting. I tried re-aligning the needle to point to the solder iron tip instead of the pin. This did not produce improvements at all. I had to aim fairly high to avoid hitting the pin and now the solder was not flowing down and bulging.

I was getting frustrated and decided to look at a few videos of commercial soldering machines for inspiration.

After a few hours I devised a new mount for the soldering needle. The previous mount was allowing adjustments only in the angle of the soldering iron as well as the needle. This configuration seems quite limited. Applying maximum effort here is the new plan:

Now the syringe is mounted on this dual clamp. The clamp allows for both items to rotate. The other end of the clamp is connected to a 3mm steel rod, which adds another degree of rotation. Finally the rod is connected to the mount plate with a plank which allows both: XY movement as well as rotation.

Here is the final assembly after a few dozen failed 3D printing jobs

The new mounting system adds quite a bit of flexibility to the position of the needle that guides the solder wire. Hopefully I’ll be able to find a location which works in most cases.

 

Soldering machine tests

I’ve been running the soldering machine for about 2 weeks. I added a very ugly, but effective fume extractor to the machine head.

It has 40mm fan and a square piece of carbon-activated filter to absorb the fumes. The design is not my best work and is held together with hot glue. However it does work.

Some early failures of the soldering were quite comical:

But some tweaks of the G-Code and it is mostly working now

At this stage it is completely manual programming. No computer vision at all. I’m recording all soldering sessions so they can be used for training ML models later.

My test board is fairly straight forward, so programming the G-Code is not hard. I use a simple C++ program to send the commands to the 3D printer controller. This allows me to add the necessary delay and in the future integrate some processing of the camera image.

I also managed to find an M12 camera lens with much less distortion, to the point that the image no longer needs corrections.